Blog

Where does NATO go from here?

The Russian invasion of Ukraine appears to have bolstered NATO’s unity, purpose and expenditure, with Finland and Sweden hoping to join the club soon. But what, asks Steven Chisnall, is its endgame? Where is its strategy? And what if it could not count on the United States?

Unthinking Immigration Detention

A decade on from the launch of its Hostile Environment agenda, the UK government is stepping up its campaign against asylum seekers, with indefinite imprisonment of migrants a central component. Fred Ashmore argues that immigration detention is expensive, ineffective and demeans us as a nation. It requires an urgent rethinking beyond the politics of fear.

Where’s the space for local ownership? A response to the 2022 UK International Development Strategy

The UK government's long-awaited International Development Strategy makes the case for a competitive geopolitical approach to development assistance centred on British priorities, interests and 'expertise'. Kit Dorey argues that this approach is another missed opportunity to decolonise the 'aid system', prioritise local agendas and knowledge, and create transformative change.

Community Energy: Local responses to the 2030 Climate Emergency

The UK has a vast amount to do to secure its energy supplies, cut energy usage and prices and transform its electricity production to all-clean sources. Instead of reviving fossil fuels and nuclear power, community energy entrepreneur Tony McNally argues that the government must support local solutions, including community solar and wind power schemes.

Engineers’ Choices: Disarmament by design

Designing weapons is a lucrative career choice for many engineers, but comes with deadly and destabilising consequences. Roger Orpwood argues for an ethical approach to engineering and explores some options for dis-incentivising the development of new weapons technologies.

To the victor go the spoils … a heap of ashes

Diana Francis and Andrew Rigby see the appalling tragedy unfolding in Ukraine. Acknowledging the right of Ukrainians to resist the invasion of their country by any means, they make the case for a cessation of military struggle, in favour of civilian-based resistance which might avert the ‘desertification’ of their land, its institutions, its infrastructure and its social fabric.